Jeff Tucker rhymes with Gentleman

Oh how I miss Jeff Tucker, and his editorship of Mises.org.

Always an aristocrat, a gentleman, and a scholar, even when he rejected your pieces he always did it with style, making you smile, and making you want to come back with even more attempts to strive to reach his almost impossibly high standards.

Fortunately, he has simply moved on, rather than disappeared, and is now the executive editor of Laissez Faire books. He’s also a prominent figure in the Intellectual Property debate, and was interviewed recently by Aaron Brown, on Radio Free Market, where they discussed Mr Tucker’s book, It’s a Jetsons World, freely downloadable from Mises.org.

It’s a long interview, but all the better for all that:

Jeffrey comes on, at 7:20 on the clock.

Here’s the blurb from the show:

“Is intellectual property real property?

Advocates of free markets and property rights agree on many issues. However, intellectual property is one of the most contentious issues amongst property rights proponents.

We discuss this issue with Jeffrey Tucker. His new book It’s a Jetsons World helps introduce the reader to a relatively new understanding of nonscarce goods-and why intellectual property laws need to be abolished.

Jeffrey Tucker is a person who truly comes around once in a generation. His relentless optimism, biting criticism, and eloquent praise for the beauty of liberty and markets could turn even the most hardened statist into a liberty-loving advocate of free and voluntary interaction.

Few can expound on the beauty of markets and the free society better than Jeffrey Tucker.”

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About Andy Duncan

An Austrian Internet Vigilante trying to live Outside the Asylum
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2 Responses to Jeff Tucker rhymes with Gentleman

  1. Do you have any insight as to why Tucker left Mises.org for LFB (other than this was possibly a good opportunity for him? I get the nagging feeling that thee was more to the story. The fact that Mises.org did not even mention his departure (or thank him for his service) smells to high heaven…

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